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Innovation starts here
Project Tundra is a bold initiative to build the world's largest carbon capture facility in North Dakota.

Innovative technologies are being researched to capture up to 90% of the CO2 emissions from the Milton R. Young Station's Unit 2 generator – the equivalent of permanently taking 600,000 gasoline-fueled vehicles off the road. North Dakota-based Minnkota Power Cooperative is leading the project, along with research support from the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota.

About Project Tundra

Capturing CO2

As the world focuses on reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that is emitted into the atmosphere, CO2 capture and storage technologies have become increasingly important. If successful, Project Tundra could be used as a blueprint to advance these next-generation technologies that help produce reliable, affordable and increasingly clean energy.

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SaFe and permanent CO2 Storage

Ideal Geology

North Dakota's geology is ideal for safe and permanent geologic storage of CO2. A deep porous rock layer will hold the CO2 more than a mile underground and overlying cap rock layers will seal the CO2 in the storage zone. The process of injecting and storing CO2 underground is being carefully studied and will need to be approved in a rigorous permitting process overseen by the state of North Dakota and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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About Project Tundra

Capturing CO2

As the world focuses on reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that is emitted into the atmosphere, CO2 capture and storage technologies have become increasingly important. If successful, Project Tundra could be used as a blueprint to advance these next-generation technologies that help produce reliable, affordable and increasingly clean energy.

Learn More
SaFe and permanent CO2 Storage

Ideal Geology

North Dakota's geology is ideal for safe and permanent geologic storage of CO2. A deep porous rock layer will hold the CO2 more than a mile underground and overlying cap rock layers will seal the CO2 in the storage zone. The process of injecting and storing CO2 underground is being carefully studied and will need to be approved in a rigorous permitting process overseen by the state of North Dakota and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Learn More
Project Tundra By The Numbers
95%

CO2 reduction

800

Years of recoverable coal reserves in North Dakota

600,000

Equivalent number of cars removed per year

1

Billion dollars of capital investment

Project Tundra By The Numbers
95%

CO2 reduction

600,000

Equivalent number of cars removed per year

800

Years of recoverable coal reserves in North Dakota

1

Billion dollars of capital investment

Project Tundra By The Numbers
95%

CO2 reduction

600K

Equivalent number of cars removed per year

800

Years of recoverable coal reserves in North Dakota

1

Billion dollars of capital investment

Project Tundra By The Numbers
95%

CO2 reduction

800

Years of recoverable coal reserves in North Dakota

600 K

Equivalent number of cars removed per year

1

Billion dollars of capital investment

Project Tundra News

KFGO radio features Project Tundra
October 3, 2019

KFGO radio host Joel Heitkamp featured Project Tundra during a segment on his News & Views program on Oct. 2. Heitkamp interviewed Stacey Dahl, Minnkota senior manager of external affairs.

Minnkota receives DOE grant for Project Tundra
September 17, 2019

Minnkota has received $9.8 million in federal grant funding to move forward on a Project Tundra design study.

Deep dive for data
July 25, 2019

A geophysical survey seeks to shake out vital subsurface information for North Dakota carbon storage projects like Project Tundra.

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