Project Tundra is in the advanced research
and design phase. If the project moves
ahead, construction will commence in
2022-2023

In the meantime, Project Tundra is pursuing financing opportunities and preparing to begin the permitting work. The process of capturing, injecting and storing CO2 underground is being carefully studied and will need to be approved in a rigorous regulatory process overseen by the state of North Dakota and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Project Research

Energy Experts

Minnkota has secured up to $15 million from the state of North Dakota’s Lignite Research Fund in 2019 to conduct research and advanced design work on Project Tundra.

The project is also pursuing a U.S. Department of Energy grant totaling $12 million. This funding would support a Front-End Engineering and Design (FEED) study at the Milton R. Young Station, which includes the advanced design, engineering and evaluation of project economics.

The Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota is supporting Project Tundra research. The EERC is recognized as one of the world’s leading developers of cleaner, more efficient energy and environmental technologies.

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Permitting and Financing

Engaging Stakeholders

Minnkota is preparing to pursue the necessary federal and state permits required to build the CO2 capture facility and to store the CO2 in a deep geologic formation. These permits ensure the safe injection of CO2, protection of the groundwater resources and the constant monitoring of the CO2 to ensure it remains in the storage zone.

Project Tundra is estimated to cost approximately $1 billion. The project is currently seeking financial partners to help utilize existing 45Q federal tax credits, which are currently $50 per ton of CO2 that is captured and stored in a geologic formation deep underground or $35 per ton that is captured and used for enhanced oil recovery.

Project Research

Energy Experts

Minnkota has secured up to $15 million from the state of North Dakota’s Lignite Research Fund in 2019 to conduct research and advanced design work on Project Tundra.

The project is also pursuing a U.S. Department of Energy grant totaling $12 million. This funding would support a Front-End Engineering and Design (FEED) study at the Milton R. Young Station, which includes the advanced design, engineering and evaluation of project economics.

The Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota is supporting Project Tundra research. The EERC is recognized as one of the world’s leading developers of cleaner, more efficient energy and environmental technologies.

Learn More
Permitting and Financing

Engaging Stakeholders

Minnkota is preparing to pursue the necessary federal and state permits required to build the CO2 capture facility and to store the CO2 in a deep geologic formation. These permits ensure the safe injection of CO2, protection of the groundwater resources and the constant monitoring of the CO2 to ensure it remains in the storage zone.

Project Tundra is estimated to cost approximately $1 billion. The project is currently seeking financial partners to help utilize existing 45Q federal tax credits, which are currently $50 per ton of CO2 that is captured and stored in a geologic formation deep underground or $35 per ton that is captured and used for enhanced oil recovery.

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